Explore Like a Pirate: Chapter 5

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Hi everyone,

Welcome back to our book study on Explore Like a Pirate, by Michael Matera. Thanks to Rachael over at Sweet Sweet Primary for putting this book study together.

Today we are looking at Chapter 5: From the Helm: Getting to Know Your Crew. This chapter is all about the tools that will help us to create game inspired course design.

When designing game inspired courses, we have to determine what type of player your students are. According to Richard Bartle’s theory, there are four groups of gamer personalities: Achievers, Socializers, Explorers, and Killers (griefers). By knowing the type of gamer each of your students are, you can be sure to include something for all types of gamers.

I found the different types of personality fascinating. I can think of many of my students who fall into these personalities without giving the Richard Bartle test.

Achievers
Achievers are those students who want to earn points and show a level of mastery. In our classroom, Achievers are the kids who want to know they are doing well. They like to show off how they are doing and their position or advancement in the game. To motivate an Achiever, you can include daily quests and leader boards.

Socializers
Socializers play games because they enjoy interacting with others. In our classroom, often time the Socializers are our talkers. To engage Socializers while designing game inspired courses, we should think about making a team challenge that requires out of class networking. Socializers would also like the aspect of trading with others.

Explorers
Explores enjoy an open game where they can discover new areas on their own. According to Michael Matera, Explores move at their own pace and are not too concerned with mastery of the game. To motivate an Explorer, you can include locked areas or levels.

Killers(griefers)
Killers enjoy playing high action games and look to battle or beat something quickly. If the reward is worth it, Killers will take the risk. To motivate Killers, you can include collecting things or a protection aspect. Like protecting a person or a house.

Matera also talks about Jon Radoff’s four key components of game design. Aspects of his game design are: Immersion, Achievement, Cooperation, and Competition. By looking at the four categories, we can think of ways to deliver our course objectives.

Immersion
When thinking about immersion, we design a game course that allows the students to grow and explore. this is where the students become the heroes of their own stories.

Achievement
We want to give the students multiple times or opportunities to practice a skill. We have to be sure to make the work challenging but not too difficult where the kids want to give up. The more opportunities the kids have to reach a level of proficiency in the game, the more practice they get at a skill.

Cooperation
TEAMWORK! TEAMWORK! TEAMWORK!
Just like in anything, we want our students to work together. When developing game inspired courses, we need to make sure that we include ways for our kids to work together toward a common goal.

Competition
Competition is a great way to have students interact with each other and work together on a team.

Michael Matera uses The SAPS Model in his course design. This helps to include different motivating factors for all students. Some kids are motivated by status. This is where leaderboards, badges, and daily quests come into play. The students are given feedback on how they are doing and are motivated when others see how well they are doing. Another motivating factor is access. Students become more motivated and engaged when they have access to new material or things they didn’t have before, like being able to find secret areas. When designing game inspired courses, we also want to include power. You can give the students power by giving them choice. The last thing we want to think about when designing the coursework is what Michael Matera calls stuff. We want to include game related things, like a small sword or a power shield. We want to include “stuff” that is related to the game. This will keep the students instrinsically motivated.

I can’t wait to read what comes next. Join us next week for a look at Chapter 6.

Thanks for stopping by and saying hi,
Rachel

Click on the picture below to go back to Sweet Sweet Primary’s blog and read about what others have to say about Chapter 5.

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2 thoughts on “Explore Like a Pirate: Chapter 5

  1. Before reading this chapter, I’d never really given much thought to the types of gamers there are, but this makes perfect sense. Knowing your students’ gaming styles would really help in designing a game that gets them motivated! Thanks for linking up.

  2. I think the biggest challenge for me will be adding elements from the SAPS model into my class. I typically lean toward status and power, so it’ll be interesting to figure out how to add the other parts in, too. I can’t wait for the next chapter!

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